A Plano roofer says, living in the great state of Texas has many advantages, but it has some drawbacks, too. One particular problem living here is the challenge of protecting your home against those yearly hailstorms that are so common in this part of the country.

Nearly 50% of all homeowner claims to insurance company comes as a result of damage caused by hail. Across the nation, total claims in property and crop damage from hail total $1 billion annually. Most of these claims come from the states Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Kansas.

At 80 to 100 mph of force, hail is one of the most destructive natural forces against even the most solidly built roofs. In an effort to cut back on claims, insurance companies have started to offer incentives for homeowners choosing to install impact resistant roofing.

What Is Impact Resistant Roofing?

Roofing materials are rated based on their ability to absorb high impact contact from hail or flying debris. The weakest material receives a rating of one, and the material that can absorb the most impact enjoys a 4 rating. Most roofing material with a class 4 impact rating is considered impact resistant roofing. A soundly built roof with class 1 material will not last long in a hail prone or high weather area, no matter how much care and attention were put into its construction.

What Are The Different Types Of Impact Resistant Roofing?

Asphalt

The most common type of roofing is asphalt shingles because of its affordability and ease of install. Likewise, the most common impact resistant roofing also comes in the form of asphalt shingles. Depending on the manufacturer, these shingles have some degree of rubberized backing to increase the amount of bounce, thereby making it better able to absorb the impact of hail coming in at 80 to 100 mph.

TPO

Other options include rubberized slate shingles, which is basically rubber shingles made to resemble the look of slate. It’s also called TPO, or Thermoplastic Polyolefin. It’s installed in a similar manner as slate shingles and has a natural bounce similar to impact resistant asphalt shingles. TPO shingles come with a 50-year warranty and a 100-year life expectancy.

Slate

Slate is considered impact resistant. However, you’ll need to pay attention to the thickness of the slate you’re choosing. 5/8″ slate typically receives a Class-4 rating, making it impact resistant. 1/4″ slate is not as strong, and will usually come with a class 3 rating.

Metal

Metal roofs come with many advantages such as energy efficiency, curb appeal, and environmental friendliness. Perhaps the most significant benefit is that they are naturally very resistant to hail. Most metal roofs come with a class 4 rating.

How Much Extra Can You Expect To Pay?

Prices vary depending on the specific type of impact resistant roofing. Labor costs should remain fixed whether you’re installing traditional roofing or impact-resistant roofing. This includes stripping the old roof down to the deck, inspecting and fortifying the deck, installing the new roof, and hauling debris away.

The only change in price you should expect when you’re moving from a traditional roof in one material to an impact resistant roof in the same type of material is a shift in material price. To determine how much you should expect the cost to jump, do your homework ahead of time. Price out the different material options per foot, so you know what you should expect when asking for an estimate from a roofer.

Is Impact Resistant Roofing Worth The Cost?

No roof is hail proof. But impact resistant roofs do a much better job protecting your home than a class 1 or 2 roof featured on most homes. If you live in a heavy weather region of the country where your roof takes an awful lot of impact abuse, then you may want to consider installing one.

In these areas insurance companies usually offer a discount on insurance premiums as an incentive for purchasing an impact resistant roof. Typical discounts range around the 20% mark.

But, a word of caution here. Look for loopholes. Some insurance companies will not cover cosmetic damage to the roof. This is particularly important to know for anyone choosing a metal roof option. Dings and dents may not be of concern to an insurance provider.

Depending on how much more you pay for an impact resistant roof, you should be able to make up the difference in cost within a few years if your insurance company has given you a discounted premium. Also, the installation of an impact resistant roof will up the value of your home, which helps you recover some of those expenses when the time comes to sell.

How Is Impact Resistant Roofing Installed?

This type of roofing is installed in much the same way as other roofing. Impact resistant shingles are installed with a nearly identical method to traditional shingles:

  • remove overhanging branches
  • strip roof down to decking
  • inspect the roof for damage
  • renail roof deck
  • seal roof deck against water intrusion
  • install flashing
  • install high impact shingles
  • install roof vents

How To Choose An Impact Resistant Roof

A few factors need to be taken into consideration when choosing an impact resistant roof: budget, resale value.

Budget

Asphalt shingles tend to be the most economical choice for roofing, including impact resistant roofing. It’s an excellent choice for those who may have tighter budgets, those who already have shingle roofs, and those who live in neighborhoods where asphalt shingle roofs are standard.

Resale Value

Second to budget is resale value. Choosing an impact resistant roof should already increase your home’s value, thereby fetching a higher resale price. However, some particular roofs are more desirable than others. And some materials are not as appealing to potential buyers. Do some research to see what’s popular in your area, and what particular materials will up the resale price of your home.

Aesthetics

If you are counting on living in your home for the next twenty years or so, you may want a roof that will protect you well and be aesthetically pleasing. Everyone has different tastes in roofing whether it be slate, metal, or asphalt shingles.

Take into consideration your budget, potential insurance discounts, peace of mind knowing you’re protected, resale value, and personal preference when deciding whether or not to make your next roof an impact resistant one.

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